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Here's to living your Best Day Ever. Every day.

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Here's to living your Best Day Ever. Every day.

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Your Best Doesn’t Have to be Perfect

The Secret of the Wabi-Sabi Way   I recently came across a term new to me: wabi-sabi. Wabi-sabi is a Japanese word used to described aesthetics, and more broadly, a worldview that values the imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. Sound a little confusing? Here are some examples: Imperfect: Just as my toddler’s artwork is far from a perfect representation of a tree or a flower, it doesn’t matter. There is a simple beauty in that imperfection. Impermanent: Good things don’t always last, like the intricate pattern of frost left on your car window that melts away in the sun. A phenomenal color job on your hair will eventually grow out. Incomplete: Unfinished doesn’t mean it’s not done, like the project you abandoned because you outgrew its purpose. In his book “Wabi Sabi Simple,” author Richard R. Powell calls wabi-sabi a kind of beauty – “beauty rooted in nature and balance.” That which is rough, rustic or simple is beautiful: a worn sweater, handmade pottery, or a bunch of wildflowers. The principles of wabi-sabi can be used in any area of your life, a home, at work, and at play. In a way, it is permission to not get in knots when things don’t go as planned. How many of us are too hard on ourselves when we fall short of a goal? Not only do we embrace acceptance in our daily life with wabi-sabi, we also allow our authentic self to shine – even if we’re rough around the edges. You can practice wabi-sabi in your life in a number of ways. Here are a few ideas: At Home – Your mother’s idea of a dinner party may have included pressed table linens, menu cards, and full place settings, but you don’t have to entertain that way. Embracing wabi-sabi can mean calling a few friends over on a whim one afternoon, throwing on a festive table cloth from the dollar store, and setting out a few bowls with chips, dips, and veggies. Play some games and enjoy the company! At Work – In launching a business, or a new product or service within your business, “good enough” really can be good enough to bring your new offering to the world. And if something doesn’t work, that’s OK, too. Learn from it and move on. That’s wabi-sabi. At Play – You can call upon the spirit of wabi-sabi by trying a sport you’re not good at. We’re not all Serena Williams, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a game of tennis. If you’re competitive, this may be hard(!), but it will also remind you not to be so hard on yourself when you try something new. In recognizing the wabi-sabi in your life, you can live lighter, appreciate the beauty in the little things and let go easier when things don’t work out the way you planned. Linkshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabihttps://www.amazon.com/Wabi-Sabi-Simple-beauty-imperfection/dp/1593371780

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Your Best Doesn’t Have to be Perfect

The Secret of the Wabi-Sabi Way   I recently came across a term new to me: wabi-sabi. Wabi-sabi i...

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Friday Vibes 3.17.17

Friday Vibes takes a spin around the web and weaves together pieces for living your best life. Here are a few things I'm majorly crushing on this week.Mantra: Everything I need is within me. Motivate: Aaptiv seems to be the latest and greatest workout app that puts a personal trainer in your ear while you’re at the gym. Sign me up!  Mocktail: Strawberry, lemon, and basil infused water. I'm ready for you, summer. Move: Mix up your workout routine by spelling your name. Media: What's the deal with “adrenal fatigue?” Seriously. What is it? Read this article to understand exactly what it is and how you can combat the symptoms of fatigue, bloat, and headaches.  (image from www.robbwolf.com)  

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Friday Vibes 3.17.17

Friday Vibes takes a spin around the web and weaves together pieces for living your best life. He...

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Avoiding wheat? Here’s what to eat instead

For some people, avoiding wheat is a necessity of life. People with celiac disease cannot tolerate the gluten in wheat, giving them terrible stomach cramps and other miserable symptoms. Many believe, while they don’t have celiac disease, they do have an intolerance to gluten and decide to reduce their intake or avoid it all together. Whether you absolutely cannot stomach wheat or simply want to cut down on your intake, there are many grain alternatives you can try. Not only do these alternatives help you avoid gluten but they also may shake up your regular routine. Who couldn’t use a little variety, right? Here are some alternatives you may want to try, not only for their nutritional value but also for the adventure of trying something new. Quinoa – This grain can be used in granolas, breads, salads and crackers and helps you feel full longer. It's fluffy, nutty, and delicious. Plus it's full of protein, iron, vitamin B, and fiber so eat up. Rice – Many cultures have been using rice as their staple grain for centuries. Today, it’s widely used as a gluten-free alternative in breads and pastas. You may want to consider this one caveat, rice can be high in arsenic, fortunately, the FDA is working to regulate it. Learn more here. Buckwheat – Although “wheat” is part of its name, buckwheat has no relation to standard wheat and is safe for those with celiac. Buckwheat is great in cereals and pastas. Japanese soba noodles are made from buckwheat – so you can enjoy a bowl of yakisoba without the guilt! Millet – This grain is not just for the birds. While often used in bird feed, millet can be cooked like couscous and has a light, almost lemony flavor. Millet flour can also be used in baking. Almond Meal – Ground almonds, or almond meal, is a great additive in baked goods to deliver more protein and add a dense, satisfying texture. It’s also used as a replacement for breadcrumbs in many Paleo recipes. You can experiment with other nut meal varieties as well. Amaranth – This ancient grain was cultivated by the Aztecs 8,000 years ago. The tiny amaranth grain can be cooked similar to rice and packs a real nutritional punch with high amounts of iron, calcium, fiber and other nutrients. Ground into a flour, it can be used in concert with other kinds of flour – it’s typically too dense for use on its own. Sprouted grains – Some sprouted grains do include wheat, but if you don’t have to avoid wheat entirely, sprouted grains are more easily digestible than their non-sprouted counterparts. They offer some excellent nutritional benefits, such as lower carbohydrates and higher protein, less gluten and more soluble fiber than their regular grains. Linkshttp://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/ucm319870.htmhttp://www.celiac.com/articles/23441/1/Is-Buckwheat-Flour-Really-Gluten-Free/Page1.htmlhttp://foodfacts.mercola.com/amaranth.htmlhttp://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/sprouted-whole-grains  

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Avoiding wheat? Here’s what to eat instead

For some people, avoiding wheat is a necessity of life. People with celiac disease cannot tolerat...

Read more

Friday Vibes 03.10.17

Friday Vibes takes a spin around the web and weaves together pieces for living your best life. Here are a few things I'm majorly crushing on this week. Mantra: I understand. I see. I speak. I love. I do. I feel. I am. Maven: This marathon runner posted a picture of her cellulite and you will love her for it. #ihavearunnersbody Move: Need to hit the reset button after a long week? Here are the 7 best yoga poses for detoxification. Make: Make your work lunch much more exciting with this Whole Foods inspired mason jar salad from Oh She Glows. Motivate: Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony. - Mahatma Gandhi  

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Friday Vibes 03.10.17

Friday Vibes takes a spin around the web and weaves together pieces for living your best life. He...

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You Need People Who Believe in You

I work out 5 to 7 days per week and have for over 20 years. It’s in my nature to be fit, active and push myself. Right now, I’m on a ‘boot camp’ kick. After trying many of the boot camp classes in town, I settled on the hardest one, run by a former pro-athlete. He pushes everyone to their limits and his classes are always different. I rarely do the same move twice in a 6-week period. The variety, the intensity and the shared pain and camaraderie all work together for one amazing class. Last week, though, I found myself dreading class. I also noticed I wasn’t working as hard as usual. It’s unlike me to not be extremely competitive with myself and others, so I sat down with a giant cup of tea and tried to figure out why I had lost my motivation for this class. The answer came quickly. “It don’t matter what music I play, you ain’t gonna work hard!” Two weeks earlier, during a particularly grueling set of burpees and stair climbers, I had requested some upbeat music (Lady Gaga specifically) and that’s what I got in return: “It don’t matter what music I play, you ain’t gonna work hard.”  It demoralized me and it angered me. I should have called bullsh** on the attitude and given Mr. Pro Athlete a piece of my mind, but I meekly just did another million burpees and stair climbers as he yelled to the class, “No one gets to quit this set until Anne-Marie does. And you can thank Anne-Marie for this music!” (as he put on a ballad of Lady Gaga’s, throwing the gym into a somber, depressive pall). I was embarrassed. I was angry. And instead of galvanizing me, over the next week, I just found myself not caring. Why should I try hard if he’s already pigeon-holed me into being a lazy, sandbagging loser? Why push myself for a teacher that doesn’t acknowledge hard work and publicly tries to take me down a notch? Forget this “You’re doing this for yourself! How lucky are you that you get the luxury to work out an hour a day! Your 50-year-old self will thank you for this investment” pep talk that I usually give myself. I was angry. And I didn’t want to try anymore; at least not for HIM. If I was going to try, it was going to be at another gym, for myself, and with an instructor who believed in me. All of this drove home an important lesson: surround yourself with people who believe in you; who uplift you and who support you. Believing in you doesn’t mean coddling you. It doesn’t mean letting you take the easy route. But, it does mean supporting you to reach your next goals, telling you that you have one more rep/late night/craft show/sales call in you and encouraging you to reach your best and brightest potential with love, boundaries, and aggressive cheerleading. Take a look at your inner circle; your support team. Are they all-in to help you reach your next level? Do they have the ability to do it with compassion, determination, and thoughtful feedback? Do they make you want to be a better human being, a better community member, a better parent, and a better businessperson? It might be time to change out some people on your team. I know it’s time for me to change out one person on my team; buh-bye Mr. Pro Athlete. I’ll miss your workouts but I won’t miss the way you made me feel.

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You Need People Who Believe in You

I work out 5 to 7 days per week and have for over 20 years. It’s in my nature to be fit, active a...

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